Guest Lecture by Jean Flemma


Jean will speak on United States ocean fisheries management strategies in a presentation at BOKU on Wednesday, 14 June 2017 at 18.00, entitled, "Fish Tales: The challenges to achieving sustainable ocean fisheries management in the U.S.".

Jean Flemma (MSc) is an expert in governmental policies aimed at ocean fisheries management and wildlife conservation. For nearly 25 years, Jean served as a subject-matter expert and senior staff-member to several U.S. Congress committees having environmental focus. She has also been an active contributor to international bodies such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of wild fauna and flora (CITES) and the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna (ICCAT). She presently is a private consultant to non-governmental organisations and foundations on strategies to implement progressive ocean protection strategies and treaty obligations.

Jean will speak on United States ocean fisheries management strategies in a presentation at BOKU on Wednesday, 14 June 2017 at 18.00, entitled, "Fish Tales: The challenges to achieving sustainable ocean fisheries management in the U.S.".

U.S. marine fisheries are considered some of the most intensively-managed fisheries in the world. The success of the governmental efforts is the result of a science-based management approach required under federal law. Over the last decade, the U.S. management system has addressed overfishing, rebuilt stocks, reduced bycatch, and helped rebuild local fishing economies. In doing so, it has become a model elsewhere.

This was not always the case, however. Modern fisheries management in the U.S. began only in 1976 with the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation Act, but the need to conserve U.S. fish stocks became apparent years earlier as large-scale fishing vessels from several foreign nations took large quantities of fish off both the East and West Coasts just miles from shore. As fishermen experienced reduced catches and scientists sounded the alarm about declining stocks, the U.S. became one of the first countries to claim exclusive jurisdiction over fisheries stocks within 200 miles of its shores. The benefits of eliminating foreign fishing vessels from U.S. waters were short-lived, however, and it took many more years to address the challenges of implementing a sustainable management regime. This talk will explore that history and evolution of management that has resulted in the system that exists today.


12.06.2017